Quilting, Farming, Variety

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Preparing for Winter -- 2

There was frost the next morning and the acrid smell of frozen grass filled the air. Smoke from the stovepipe curled only a little before being carried away to the holler by the strong north wind. By mid-morning the sun began warming things and Mama said, "Let's stomp peas today, Charlotte!" She took her feed sack full of dry peas out into the yard. Charlotte jumped onto the burlap bag. "This is one thing you can jump on to your heart's content," said Mama. "Pretend you're jumping on the bed!" She jumped and jumped. Mama turned the sack and they both stomped, and the dry pods broke into pieces, releasing the peas. Charlotte giggled and fell off. Mama set the sack upright and untied the end.
She picked up the sack and held the opened end high above her empty dishpan. The dry peas fell into the pan and the wind blew the broken pieces of hulls away. Then she poured the peas from the dishpan into an empty bucket. Zing! Zing, zing! The peas sounded like hailstones on a tin roof as they hit the metal bucket. She poured them back and forth, and each time bits of hulls and trash blew out until the peas were clean.

Now Mama took the clean peas to the kitchen. She filled a jar with some of them and added a few moth balls. "These peas are to plant next year," she said, "and the mothballs will keep weevils out of them." She poured boiling water over the rest of the peas and let them sit for a few minutes. "I scalded these peas to kill any weevils that might be in them now; they're the ones I'll cook this winter. The seed peas can't be scalded because the hot water would kill the little plant that is waiting inside the pea," explained Mama. She spread the scalded peas out on a clean cloth and let them dry in the sun and wind for a few days before storing them away for winter meals.

Charlotte

If you're fairly new to my blog you might enjoy reading more about our farm life in the 1940s.  The stories are under the label, Family.  If there are two parts to a story, the first part will be preceded by the second; keep this in mind to keep from knowing the end of the story first :)








16 comments:

  1. Once again I am enchanted. Reminds me of Laura Ingalls Wilder writing

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  2. You need to write a book. Your illustrations and stories are educational as well charming.
    I never knew these things about peas. It's interesting to learn how you busted them out of their shells and your Mom prepared for winter to cook and how she stored the seeds for the next year planting.
    You have a soft comforting writing voice, I could read your stories all day long and not tire of them. :)

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  3. I'm with E. C. She said it for me. You have a wonderful writing voice and I love your drawings as well. I can definitely see all this in a book. You go, girl!

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  4. How interesting! Marshall's dad grew up in the mountains, and I've heard him speak of the "holler" many times.

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  5. Makes me feel like little house too : )And I agree with EC you need to write a book!

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  6. You would be a great children's book author! I love it. blessings,Kathleen

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  7. Oh Charlotte, your illustrations and tales of days past are wonderful.
    From your telling I can see the scene playing out. Wonderful.

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  8. What a sweet tale. I'm also with EC. This could be and should be a book! Your drawings are as enchanting as your words. Promise us you'll look in to it. :)

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  9. I loved this story. It reminds me of the Little House books. I've never heard of doing this before.

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  10. I can tell by the comments that everyone else feels the way I do about these precious stories Charlotte. They just fill me right up with joy!

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  11. LOVE your writing! Such sweetness and your drawings are so sweet as well! Charlotte, you asked me about showing you how to carry the thread from one stitch to the other.........I am not sure how to show you, however, if the space you are embroidering is farther than 1/4 inch away, I would say to finish off and to start on the new space without carrying the thread over. That keep the back of your work cleaner and tangle free, plus it does not show through to the front of your embroidery. I hope this helps.........is this what you were wanting to know?

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  12. me too - reminds me Laura Ingalls Wilder - so enjoyed her books, my girls did too.

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  13. Very sweet story and illustrations, Charlotte. I really enjoyed this.

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  14. Love reading your stories. The drawings add to what we can only imagine in our thoughts! Thanks for sharing them with all of us.

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  15. You have such charming stories. I love your illustrations and think they would make a beautiful redwork quilt.

    Since I read about your redwork quilts, I've wanted to make one and I may this winter. If I can ever decide on what pictures to use.

    Thanks for sharing these lovely snippets from your heart. :)

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