Quilting, Farming, Variety

Tuesday, August 9, 2011

A LITTLE RAIN !!!!!

Last night I heard it!! Loud thunder, fierce lightning, and then, raindrops falling on the rooftop!! "Oh thank you, Lord!" I uttered. It was only 1/2 inch, but the grass seems to have responded and already looks greener. At least I'm somewhat revived! and thank each of you who have pitied me after my complaints. :)


Now I have a flower question: in this picture, a few of my irises are in view. They look really tired, and as in most summers, their fronds turned brown on the tips. If I cut them back will they still bloom next spring or do they need the fronds to make food for their corms in order to bloom? How do you manage your irises each year after they have bloomed?

Charlotte

9 comments:

  1. mine are in an area where they are not in the way and I just leave them to die down in the fall. I have not had good luck with the flowers though, year to year it seems like less blossoms. We got an inch of rain and our power was out for 6 hours. Back on now and the sun is out and will be another hot one I guess but glad it was cool while the power was out.
    Karen
    http://karensquilting.com/blog/

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  2. I don't cut mine back because they are not in the way. I wish I knew the answer to that, but I don't..Susie

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  3. Wonderful that you got rain, even 1/2 inch...we are sooooo thirsty here on the uppper Texas coast. Sorry, I don't know a thing about Iris'....good luck, hope someone can help you out...

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  4. YEAH!!!! I'm glad you got a little rain. We have it forcasted here for the next several days so maybe it will head your way. :)

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  5. If those are just regular iris, cut off the stems where they've already bloomed. Then trim the foliage back in an upside down V shape. They will most definitely bloom next year. And you'll need to separate the "corms"/bulbs - if they get too thick.
    Glad you got rain!

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  6. Glad you got some rain! Let the iris's completly turn yellow before trimming off the tops. The yellowing process is storing food for the bulbs. This way they will be able to bloom next year as well as multiply. After they have completly dried, you can also sprinkle a litte blood meal, (found at the feed store) over the area and lightly work it in. This can usually be done in late fall. It is just a good meal for the iris's when they wake up. Blessings,Kathleen

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  7. I'm so glad you got rain, Charlotte! Sounds like you're getting great advice from some wonderful gardeners.

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  8. After my Iris bloom and the flowers wilt and start turning brown, I cut the stem off way down at the bottom of the plant.
    They have done their job of flowering and now need the rest..That gives them time to get strong for next years blooms...If you visit my blog again ..look for them at the end of the garden ;o)

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  9. I've cut mine back-and the still bloom the next year. I'm glad you got some rain!!

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